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After the Unjust Sentencing...
After the Unjust Sentencing...
Wadi Natrun Prison detainees' families shocked at 15-year sentences against their young sons.
Monday, March 14,2016 04:46
IkhwanWeb

 I will not talk about the final verdict, or the clearly exaggerated punishment of fifteen years in prison, nor about how these perfectly guiltless young people's lives will be lost. I will talk about some of the details of what took place after the verdict.


On the first day after the verdict, nearly 100 young people waited since the morning in in Wadi Natrun Prison to hear news about their final verdict and sentencing. One of these young men, Gendi, paid a prison warden to allow him to telephone his mother to learn what punishment he got in the sentencing session yesterday (Saturday).

Gendi's mother did not want to tell him of the long prison term he go. How could she tell her son, who had been held in Egypt's Guantanamo jail for two and a half years, that the final cour decision sent him to prison for fifteen years. Commenting on the court ruling, the prison warden said in amazement: "What do they mean the appeal was quickly rejected? These kids will rot in jail to the end of their days!"

When these youths' families visited them for the first time after the unjust final verdict and sentencing, the prison's wardens themselves cursed the judiciary for their clear injustice. Even prison officers refused to search the detained youths' families – feeling the shock after hearing the news and the absurd sentencing, and sympathizing with them. Some described this visit as a sad "mourning" due to the large number of weeping parents and family members.

Ayman Moussa, Engineering School University student, collapsed when he learned he was sentence to fifteen years in jail.

Moussa is a young man described by his friends as a good-hearted, very respectable and polite guy. His father died a few months ago, but he was unable to attend his funeral because the coup authorities refused to allow him that.

A friend of Gendi and Moussa said that they were the most kind-hearted youths he ever knew. One of them studied engineering at the British University in Egypt, the other is an engineering student at the German University in Egypt.

"Those are the most patriotic youths in this homeland. They never hurt anyone. They loved their country Egypt."
tags: Coup / Anti-Coup / Military Coup / Military Junta / Wadi Natrun
Posted in EGYPT  
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