Ikhwanweb :: The Muslim Brotherhood Official English Website

Tue109 2018

Last update19:14 PM GMT

Back to Homepage
Font Size : 12 point 14 point 16 point 18 point
:: Issues > Human Rights
"War criminals" leak strikes at heart of Israeli society
Paul Larudee considers the implications for Israel and its armed forces of the leaking of the details of 200 Israeli military personnel who participated in the invasion of Gaza of 2008-09, which resulted in the murder of more than 1,400 people, primarily civilians, including over 340 children.
Wednesday, November 24,2010 22:05
by Paul Larudee redress.cc

 Paul Larudee considers the implications for Israel and its armed forces of the leaking of the details of 200 Israeli military personnel who participated in the invasion of Gaza of 2008-09, which resulted in the murder of more than 1,400 people, primarily civilians, including over 340 children.

”Instead of asking why some groups or individuals in Israeli society are willing to take great risks to hold that society accountable for its actions, Israel prefers to blame the problem on treacherous, self-hating, anti-Semitic Jews, and to instill fear and hatred as the means for preventing Israelis from examining their consciences.” (Paul Larudee)

When unknown elements in Israel leaked the name, rank, identification number and other information about two hundred Israeli military personnel who reportedly participated in the 2008-09 invasion of Gaza, the effect was sudden and profound, according to sources in Israel.

Although the first site on which the  
leaked information appeared was taken down by the host, it has continued to circulate via email, and has appeared on a number of other sites. The Israeli military and other Israeli agencies are reportedly doing all they can to shut down every site on which it appears, and to prevent it from "going viral". At least one popular blog that links to the site has received a record number of death threats.

“The root of the problem, according to the sources in Israel, is a poorly kept secret -- namely, that it is hard to serve in the Israeli military without committing war crimes, because such crimes are a matter of policy.”

What is so special about the list? As several critics have pointed out, it doesn't even state the crimes that the listed individuals are alleged to have committed.

The root of the problem, according to the sources in Israel, is a poorly kept secret -- namely, that it is hard to serve in the Israeli military without committing war crimes, because such crimes are a matter of policy. What Israeli soldier has not ordered a Palestinian civilian to open the door to a building that might house armed militants or be booby-trapped? Who has not denied access to ambulances or otherwise prevented a Palestinian from getting to medical care, education or employment?

Some, of course, have gone much farther, and deliberately targeted unarmed civilians (as in the "buffer zones" along the border of the Gaza Strip), tortured detainees, and have either ordered or participated in massive death, injury and destruction at one time or another. These acts have all been heavily documented by numerous credible agencies, such as the Palestinian Centre for Human Rights, Amnesty International, the Goldstone Commission, Human Rights Watch, and B'tselem.

What has been missing in large measure is accountability. To be sure, isolated victories have been won, usually with great effort. Within Israel, token trials and punishment, such as the conviction of the shooter of British human rights volunteer Tom Hurndall, continue to provide a thin cloak of respectability to the Israeli justice system. Beyond Israel's control, however, senior Israeli officials have been forced to avoid travel to an increasing number of countries for fear of law-enforcement action. Nevertheless, ordinary Israelis had not yet been made to feel directly subject to such pressures.

The publication of the list of 200 changes everything. The list contains the names of a few high-ranking officers, but many of those named are in the lower ranks, all the way down to sergeant. The effect is to make ordinary Israelis concerned that they, too, may be subject to arrest abroad, and without the protection that well-connected higher officials might enjoy. They know what they have done, or been ordered to do, or have ordered others to do, and they suspect that they may be held accountable by foreign laws, over which their government has little control.

Many Israelis already fear that an anti-Semitic world is looking for an excuse to shut down the Zionist experiment. It is therefore not a great leap to believe that they could become pawns -- or scapegoats -- in the rising chorus of voices speaking out for Palestinian rights and against Israeli abuses.

Coupled with this is the Israeli addiction to vacationing abroad, which is a national obsession and almost a right, in the mind of many.  The result is that suddenly, with the release of the list of 200, the prospect of being held accountable outside Israel is no longer an abstraction, to be dealt with at the level of diplomats, government policy and the news stories. It hits home.

“…it [the list of 200] may cause soldiers to begin to question policy and orders far more than in the past, because of the way it may affect them personally. The debate is already taking place around the question, ‘Can I be held responsible?’”

This has serious consequences for Israeli society.  It potentially increases the number of youths who will try to avoid the military, the rates of emigration and immigration, and other patterns of commitment to Israel and its military. Most of all, according to the sources, it may cause soldiers to begin to question policy and orders far more than in the past, because of the way it may affect them personally. The debate is already taking place around the question, “Can I be held responsible?”

The answer to that question could potentially determine whether it will be possible to mount a massive offensive against a population that has no effective military forces, as in Gaza, or where saturation bombing, cluster munitions and depleted uranium might be used, as in Lebanon.  This is potentially a daunting prospect for Israeli military commanders, and some sources in Israel believe that the publication of the 200 has already had that effect.

More likely, however, it is premature to make such a call.  It seems unlikely that Israel will succeed in putting the genie back in the bottle with regard to the list of 200. It is already leaping from one place to another in cyberspace, via website and email (although Israel seems to have been temporarily successful in banning it from Facebook). However, will it generate further research and release of information on the potential offences committed by the named individuals, and will it lead to further publication of such lists?

According to the sources in Israel, the military and perhaps other agencies have gone into high gear to track down the source of the leaks.  This is a typical Israeli response to the problem. Instead of asking why some groups or individuals in Israeli society are willing to take great risks to hold that society accountable for its actions, Israel prefers to blame the problem on treacherous, self-hating, anti-Semitic Jews, and to instill fear and hatred as the means for preventing Israelis from examining their consciences.


Paul Larudee is co-founder of the Free Gaza and Free Palestine movements and an organizer in the International Solidarity Movement.

 

 Source: Redress Information & Analysis (http://www.redress.cc). Material published on Redress may be republished with full attribution to Redress Information & Analysis (http://www.redress.cc)

tags: War Criminals / Gaza / Israeli Soldier / Palestinian / Detainees / Amnesty / Zionist / Lebanon / Facebook / Palestine / Goldstone / War Crimes / Gaza Strip / Palestinian Centre for Human Rights / Human Rights Watch / Palestinian Rights
Posted in Human Rights , Palestine  
Add Comment Send to Friend Print
Related Articles
Palestinian government asks Britain not to amend war criminals law
Britain hangs out “welcome” sign to war criminals
Ghoul urges world community to put on trial Israeli war criminals
British officials moving to amend internal law to protect Israel's war criminals
Barhoum asks UK to prosecute war criminals, not encourage them
Names and Photos of Israeli War Criminals in Gaza
Hamas: Arresting Zionist war criminals is a must
Hamas: Arresting Zionist war criminals is a must
The PLC strongly condemns British government's attempts to protect war criminals
Britain Must Not Become A Safe Haven For War Criminals
Get the war criminals arrested now
Afghan demonstrators call for trial of "war criminals"
We are all war criminals
Human rights center vows to sue Israeli leaders as war criminals everywhere
War Criminals Are Becoming The Arbiters Of Law
Hamas hopes UN fact-finding mission would end in trial of Israeli war criminals
Judge Madhoun: We will work vigorously to prosecute Israeli war criminals
World needs credible body to pursue Israeli war criminals
Egyptian lawyers want Israeli war criminals put on trial
Spain to amend law to avoid trying Israeli war criminals